Author Archives: watermarkpublishing

Waialua Public Library Authors’ Night featuring Jerry Burris and Ken Kobayashi (Judge Sam King: A Memoir)

Friends of Waialua Public Library’s Authors Night program will be held on Thursday, March 6th, 6:30 PM.  This year’s event will feature a presentation and book signing with Jerry Burris and Ken Kobayashi, co-collaborators on Judge Sam King: A Memoir. The annual event is a wonderful way for attendees to meet local authors and book purchases help benefit the Waialua Public Library.

When Judge Samuel P. King died in 2010 at the age of 94, Hawai‘i Gov. Neil Abercrombie called him “the heart and soul of Hawai‘i.” Now, in Judge King’s own words, Judge Sam King: A Memoir presents the story of the man who not only witnessed Hawaiian history but helped shape the future of the islands he loved. In 2009 journalists Jerry Burris and Ken Kobayashi began a series of recorded conversations with Judge King, meeting several times a week in his office. After Judge King’s passing a year later, the duo continued work on the book, with support from the King family, combining the recorded conversations with an oral history conducted by the judge’s former law clerk, Susan Lee Waggener, and the trove of writings, news stories, speeches and other material carefully saved and organized by Judge King’s wife, Anne, and Rebecca Berry, his secretary for much of his legal career.

In addition to Judge Sam King: A Memoir, the event will feature other local titles: Song of Planet Earth by Leighton Chong;  Kohola, King of the Whales by Vincent Daubenspeck;  and Hawaiian Herbal Medicine by June Gutmanis (dec.) presented by Waimea Williams.

The Waialua Library is located across from the old Waialua Sugar Mill. Authors Night is a free event and will include refreshments and door prizes.  Please call 10 days in advance if special accommodations are needed. Phone: 637-8286.

Caregiver Events with Frances Kakugawa

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Author Frances Kakugawa and her two caregiving-focused books, Mosaic Moon and Wordsworth Dances the Waltz. (Author photo by Jason Kimura)

Providing daily care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or other long-term illness can be a brutal experience. Author and inspirational speaker Frances H. Kakugawa is well-acquainted with the struggles of caregiving, having served as caregiver for her late mother, Matsue, who was afflicted with Alzheimer’s. During this time, Frances found that poetry and journaling helped bring dignity to the caregiving experience. A retired educator, she is now an advocate of the power of writing to enrich the lives of children, the elderly and those who care for loved ones with long-term disabilities. Through her writings, workshops, school visitations, readings and speaking engagements nationwide she helps others discover how to view caregiving as a fulfilling experience rather than a burden.

The award-winning author of 11 books, Frances offers monthly writing groups in Sacramento for caregivers and also conducts workshops on poetry and memoir writing and lectures throughout the country. At least once a year, Frances returns to her home state of Hawai‘i to offer caregiving workshops for the public.

This spring, the following opportunities to hear Frances speak are available on the Big Island and O‘ahu:

Hilo:

Thursday, March 6, 5pm
Presentation offered by the Alzheimer’s Assoication
Aging and Disability Resource Center
1055 Kino‘ole Street
Call Chris Ridley, 808-443-7360, to reserve a seat
FREE event

Saturday, March 8, time TBD EVENT CANCELLED
Puna Hongwanji

O‘ahu:

Friday, March 14, 8am to 4:30pm
Third annual St. Francis Hospice Grief Conference
Ko‘olau Ballrooms and Conference Center
45-550 Kionaole Road
Registration required: $130 online / $150 by mail
Register Here

Wednesday, March 19, 4:30-6pm
Workshop: “The Art of Caregiving for Someone with Memory Loss”
15 Craigside Retirement Home – Solarium
15 Craigside Place
FREE Event
Limited space, please register. Contact: Jody Mishan, 295-2624 or jmishan@hawaii.rr.com

Frances’ books on caregiving, Mosaic Moon: Caregiving Through Poetry and the award-winning children’s book, Wordsworth Dances the Waltz, will be available for purchase at her events and can be found at local bookstores and online at www.bookshawaii.net and other online booksellers. Wordsworth Dances the Waltz was named a Mom’s Choice Awards® Silver Recipient in the category “Crossing Generations.”

Come. We Go Kau Kau.

From Kau Kau to CuisineOur newest book, From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now (by Arnold Hiura, featuring Derek Kurisu and Jason Takemura), will be hitting bookstores at the end of the month. It’s currently available for purchase at our online store.

In From Kau Kau to Cuisine, food historian Arnold Hiura provides the fascinating backstory of Hawai‘i’s culinary journey from roots in tight-knit communities to how—and what—Islanders eat today. Arnold points out, for instance, that common foods once consumed out of necessity, such as offal cuts or native plants, have once again become popular. The buzzwords of modern cuisine—sustainable, homegrown, foraged—are in fact age-old practices; many old-timers never stopped sourcing, cooking and eating their foods in these ways.

Chef Jason Takemura, Arnold Hiura and Derek Kurisu. Photo by Eloise Hiura.

Chef Jason Takemura, Arnold Hiura and Derek Kurisu. Photo by Eloise Hiura.

In addition, Big Island television personality and KTA Super Stores executive vice-president Derek Kurisu and O‘ahu executive chef Jason Takemura of Hukilau Honolulu and Pagoda Floating Restaurant, have teamed up to present 30 pairs of recipes. Each pair matches a “Then” dish from Derek—a classic plantation or traditional local-style favorite—with a “Now” dish from Chef Jason—a reinterpretation of Derek’s version or a new creation drawn from the same ingredients or cooking style. The result: Grilled ‘Opihi are reimagined as Baked Oysters with Truffle Hollandaise; Kabocha with Dried Ebi evolves into Roasted Kabocha Risotto; Portuguese Sausage–Hamburger Patty Loco Moco is remade as Sake–Soy-Braised Short Rib Loco Moco. Each dish is accompanied by mouth-watering color photography, while accompanying features offer tips on step-by-step processes.

We’ll also be kicking off the book release with a talk story and tasting event at the Pagoda Floating Restaurant International Ballroom. This event is part of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii‘s “Inspired Food” series (the last event featured Kau Kau author Arnold Hiura and Chef Alan Wong discussing Chef Alan’s book, The Blue Tomato) and is a fundraiser for the Center.

The event will take place on Saturday, February 8 at 5:30pm. (Doors open at 5pm, validated $3 parking at the Ross Dress for Less parking lot on Kanunu St.) Tickets are $75, and a limited number of VIP reserved tables are available for $2000 (10 seats). Each ticket includes a copy of the new release From Kau Kau to Cuisine: An Island Cookbook, Then and Now and access to tasting stations featuring seven different dishes from the book. VIP guests enjoy reserved seats, table service and wine.

Want to see what guests will dine on?

From “Then” — Kabocha and Dried Ebi (Pumpkin and Dried Shrimp)
From “Now” — Roasted Kabocha Risotto

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From “Then” — Shoyu Pork
From “Now” — Braised Pork Belly Bao Bun “Sliders”

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From “Then” — Poke & Surimi Patties (Fishcake Patties)
From “Now” — Shiitake & Spinach Dynamite-Crusted Opah

FishPair_large

To purchase tickets, call the JCCH at (808) 945-7633, ext. 28 or email programs@jcch.com. Space is limited, so reserve your spot now!

Personal Experiences on Pearl Harbor Day

Several titles from Watermark Publishing and Legacy Isle Publishing chronicle the personal experiences of those who lived through the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Four selections have been excerpted below from a range of individuals: a young haole-Hawaiian lawyer who would become a U.S. District Court Chief Judge; a Christian minister of Japanese descent arrested after the bombing; a young girl living in a tiny Big Island village; and a Japanese-American ROTC college student who volunteered for service with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team.

Samuel P. King, Judge Sam King: A Memoir

Born in China and raised in the Territory of Hawai‘i, Samuel Pailthorpe King was the part-Hawaiian son of the territorial Governor Samuel Wilder King, a grandson of the minister of the interior of the former Republic of Hawai‘i and a great-grandson of a Supreme Court justice of the former kingdom of Hawai‘i. King passed away on December 7, 2010.

From Chapter Five, “The War Years”:

When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on the morning of December 7, 1941, I was asleep in Honolulu. I was a relatively new lawyer and was living at the Mānoa home of my Uncle Bill, Dad’s younger brother. My cousin Billy came in my room and said, “Sunny, Sunny. They’re doing maneuvers. Let’s go take a look.” My childhood nickname was “Sunny Bunny,” because of my optimistic nature, I suppose.

I jumped out of bed and got dressed. That’s when a neighbor yelled, “Turn on your radio! Turn on your radio! The Japanese are attacking!”

On the radio we heard Webley Edwards say the famous line, “The Rising Sun has been sighted on the wingtips.” The authorities came on and said, “Stay home. Don’t go parading around, making things worse.”

We could see airplanes from our house, but the attack didn’t last all that long—maybe an hour and a half.

Norman H. Osumi, Today’s Thought —Rev. Paul S. Osumi: The Man and His Message

A Christian minister, Rev. Paul Osumi was interned for the remainder of World War II at three different detention and internment camps following the bombing of Pearl Harbor. After his release and return to Hawai‘i, he ministered at several churches throughout the state. For more than 35 years, he inspired generations of readers with his daily newspaper column, “Today’s Thought.” His son, Norman H. Osumi, is a retired banker who has spent the past decade researching his father’s life and ministry to complete this book.

From Chapter Three, “Arrest After Pearl Harbor”:

It changed my father’s and our family’s lives forever when the United States declared war on Japan following the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Father talked very little about what happened to him after the war started. I can only imagine what he went through as a 36-year-old Christian minister with a young family.

The Secretary of War issued a warrant of arrest for Father on the same day Pearl Harbor was attacked. It read:

YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED to take the body of PAUL SUTEKICHI OSUMI alias SUTEKICHI OKADA on suspicion of being an alien enemy of the United States, and to detain said person pending final action by the Commanding General, Hawaiian Department, United States Army. This Warrant of Arrest is issued under the authority of the Secretary of War of the United States by his delegated agent this 7 day of December, 1941.

Many thoughts go through my mind when I read this. First, Father was never known by the alias “Sutekichi Okada” in any of the documents I have in my possession. Sometimes I wonder if the government arrested the wrong person.

Frances H. Kakuagwa, Kapoho: Memoir of a Modern Pompeii

Born and raised in the village of Kapoho on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, Frances H. Kakugawa is an author of ten books who has received numerous awards from literary and family caregiving organizations. A retired educator, she currently gives lectures, workshops and readings to schools and community groups nationwide on the subjects of caregiving, teaching, writing and poetry.

From Chapter One, “The Enemy Wore My Face”:

Under the rising sun, / The enemy came / Wearing my face.

My face changed forever that Sunday afternoon. It seemed a same-same Sunday. My parents were at a neighbor’s birthday party, and I was home with my brothers and sister. There were comics on the floor, dishes in the sink and the sense of nothing to do that usually came on the weekends.

That particular Sunday, however, changed everything. Mr. Ito was listening to his radio.

“Japan bombed Pearl Harbor!” he shouted at anyone he saw along the road. “Japan bombed Pearl Harbor!” he shouted at the birthday guests as he rushed on to spread the news. The party immediately broke up, and everyone hurried home.

My father rushed into the house, followed by his neighbors.

“Turn the radio on. Turn the radio on!” Everyone stood in front of the radio, shouting above the crackling voice of the announcer.

“Are you sure he said Japan?”

“Where’s Pearl Harbor?”

“This means trouble. This means trouble.”

“This means war.”

“Are you sure he said Japan?”

I knew something was wrong when no one went into the kitchen to prepare lunch. I was hungry, but no one paid any attention to me. All I heard were arguments and loud voices. That was the day I learned to be afraid. That was the day I learned that there was an enemy, an enemy who would wear my face, an enemy who would not be forgotten or forgiven in the years to come. Shame, humiliation and a host of confused thoughts would now become my shadow. I would hear “Jap” for the first time. We were Americans, I knew that. We were fighting the same enemy, I knew that, too. The face I saw in the mirror looked American to me, and I’d had no reason to believe, up to then, that anyone else saw anything different. The day Mr. Ito went running around the village with the news was the day my face no longer belonged to me.

Ted T. Tsukiyama, contributor, Japanese Eyes, American Heart: Personal Reflections of Hawaii’s World War II Nisei Soldiers

Born in 1920, Ted Tsukiyama volunteered for the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and became a language specialist with the Military Intelligence Service serving in India and Burma in the Pacific war. A scholar of the Japanese-American experience and the nisei soldiers of World War II, he is the historian for the VVV, the 442nd and MIS in Hawai‘i.

From Chapter Six, “CHUGI (Loyalty): The Right Person, The Right Time,” “VVV”:

Sunday, December 7, 1941, 7:55 a.m. will remain etched in my memory forever. I couldn’t sleep because of the constant rumbling of what I thought was thunder. Going outside, I saw the sky black with smoke, punctuated by puffs of white aerial bursts. “They’re sure making this maneuver look real!” I thought. Turning on the radio, I heard the KGU announcer screaming, “Take cover! Get off the streets! We are being attacked by Japanese planes! This is the real McCoy! Take cover!”

I was stunned with surprise and shock, then with disbelief and denial: This just can’t be happening! When the realization sunk in, I first felt guilt and shame for being Japanese, followed by a dark foreboding of the suffering in store for anyone who was Japanese. I condemned the Japanese attackers: “You stupid, damned fools! Who do you think you are, attacking our great country?” I harbored these feelings of anger, outrage and hatred for our attackers for the rest of the war.

The night of December 7 was the longest, darkest and wildest night that I can recall. When we finally lay down on the Armory floor, however, physically and emotionally exhausted, sleep would not come. We feared the enemy would attack us again at any time. One of our airplanes flew low over the city, prompting a nearby machine gun to clatter into action. Sudden bursts of occasional gunfire outside were nerve-wracking, where anything that moved was shot at. No enemy appeared, but the next morning dead cattle, dogs and other pets were found around the city.

SPLASH OF ALOHA Recipe: Roasted Butterfish with Fennel and Tomato

Perhaps you’re not a turkey person. Or maybe you’ve started your Thanksgiving prep a bit late in the game. Whatever the reason you’re seeking an alternative to the traditional (enormous) Thanksgiving turkey, we have a great suggestion for you! How about trying some roasted fish? This recipe for Roasted Butterfish (Black Cod) with Fennel and Tomato from A Splash of Aloha is a nice change, suitable for a small gathering, and much less work than wrestling a big bird. The flavor of fennel is appropriate for fall, and—lucky we live Hawai‘i—there are still beautiful, fresh, ripe local tomatoes available at the farmers’ markets and in grocery stores. Something else to be thankful for!

Roasted Butterfish with Fennel and Tomato

Recipe by Sharon Kobayashi from A Splash of Aloha
Makes 4 servings                   

Roasted Butterfish with Fennel and Tomato. Recipe by Sharon Kobayashi, photo by Adriana Torres Chong.

Roasted Butterfish with Fennel and Tomato. Recipe by Sharon Kobayashi, photo by Adriana Torres Chong.

The key to this restaurant-quality recipe is to use very good, fresh fish; ripe, flavorful tomatoes and a young, fruity, drinkable wine (both for the dish and to serve at the table). Fennel is a vegetable with the texture of celery and an anise-like perfume and is readily available in grocery stores.

  • 1 lb. butterfish (black cod), cut into 2 pieces (8-oz. steaks)
  • 1 fennel bulb, medium, cut into 8 sections (plus 1 T. fronds, minced)
  • 2 c. cherry tomatoes
  • 8 bay leaves, fresh if possible
  • 8 cloves garlic
  • 1½ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. black peppercorns, crushed
  • 1 T. extra virgin olive oil
  • ²⁄₃ c. red wine (merlot or shiraz/syrah)

1. Preheat oven to 425°. In a roasting pan (preferably non-stick or foil-lined), arrange cod with fennel, tomatoes, bay leaves and garlic scattered on and about the fish.

2. Use 1 tsp. of the salt to rub into both sides of fish steaks, sprinkle the remaining salt and pepper over everything. Sprinkle the oil evenly over the vegetables.

Roasted Butterfish with Fennel and Tomato (Nutrition Facts)

Roasted Butterfish with Fennel and Tomato (Nutrition Facts)

3. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or till the liquids evaporate and the fish just begins to brown. Remove fish to a serving plate. Then deglaze the pan: Immediately add the wine to the remaining juices and browned bits, stirring to loosen solids.

4. If mixture does not thicken enough, return to the oven for 5 minutes or till it reaches sauce consistency.

5. Pour mixture over fish and garnish with fennel fronds.

Note: Salmon may be substituted for butterfish.

Sharon Kobayashi, contributing chef author, is the Chef/Owner of Latitude 22, LLC. Her company, doing business as Akamai Foods, specializes in global cuisine with a healthy flair. Their signature product, low-fat oatcakes, can be found in stores throughout Hawai‘i.

NEW RELEASE: Judge Sam King: A Memoir

Judge Sam King: A MemoirWhen Judge Samuel P. King died in 2010 at the age of 94, Hawai‘i Gov. Neil Abercrombie called him “the heart and soul of Hawai‘i.” Now, in King’s own words, Judge Sam King: A Memoir presents the story of the man who not only witnessed Hawaiian history but helped shape the future of the islands he loved.

Born to one of Hawai‘i’s most illustrious families, Samuel Pailthorpe King presided over state and federal courtrooms for more than a half-century—making landmark decisions with warmth, wisdom and an enduring humanity—but was perhaps best known for protecting people who had little or no power of their own. King presided over some of Hawai‘i’s most sensational trials, from organized crime to the Palmyra murder trials, and upheld the 1967 Hawai‘i Land Reform Act, which shifted property ownership in Hawai‘i from large trusts to ordinary citizens. King was also a co-author of the original “Broken Trust” essay in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin and the subsequent book of the same title chronicling the mismanagement of the Bishop Estate by its trustees in the 1990s. He liked to observe that “people aren’t created for laws; laws are created for people” and believed that the whole purpose of government, besides keeping its people safe, is to protect the underprivileged from the privileged. In the book’s foreword, the late U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye called King “the real deal,” noting that “Hawai‘i was fortunate to have had Sam King on the bench. He served the people of Hawai‘i well and brought honor to our state and nation.”

The newly released memoir was co-authored by Jerry Burris, one-time political reporter and editorial-page editor for the Honolulu Advertiser and a former staff writer for Hawaii Business magazine, and longtime Advertiser court reporter Ken Kobayashi, now a reporter with the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. In 2009 Burris and Kobayashi began a series of recorded conversations with King, meeting several times a week in the judge’s office. After King’s passing a year later, the duo continued work on the book, with support from the King family, combining the recorded conversations with an oral history conducted by King’s former law clerk, Susan Lee Waggener, and the trove of writings, news stories, speeches and other material carefully saved and organized by King’s wife, Anne, and Rebecca Berry, the judge’s secretary for much of his legal career.

MEET THE CO-AUTHORS

Jerry Burris and Ken Kobayashi will sign books at Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana, on Friday, Nov. 22 at 6pm.

NEW RELEASE: Today’s Thought

TodaysThought_CVR_web We are pleased to announce the release of Today’s Thought—Rev. Paul Osumi: The Man & His Message, a new book from our Legacy Isle Publishing imprint.

For more than 35 years, Rev. Paul S. Osumi inspired generations of readers of The Honolulu Advertiser and other newspapers with his daily column, “Today’s Thought.” Thousands of copies of his simple aphorisms were clipped and saved, tacked to bulletin boards, stuck to refrigerator doors and carried in wallets.

After the pastor’s death in 1996, his son Norman Osumi received many inquiries about publishing a new collection of “Today’s Thoughts.” Because three small volumes had already been published by Rev. Osumi himself, Norman felt that any collection “would need something more.”

TT_RevOsumi_web

Rev. Paul Osumi

Thus began a decade-long project to research his father’s life, with the goal of including a biography to add context to a new collection of “Thoughts.” In addition to the biography and hundreds of favorite “Thoughts,” Norman included select inspirational speeches delivered by Rev. Osumi throughout his years of ministry as well as photographs and letters from the family’s personal collection in his softcover book Today’s Thought—Rev. Paul Osumi: The Man & His Message.

Researching the book was a revealing experience for Norman. “I started reading his journals, as well as letters he wrote and received from my mother, military authorities, Christian leaders, friends and church members. The more I read, the more interested I became in my father’s past, which he rarely talked about. He almost never mentioned the war years, when he was interned and encountered many disappointments and much hardship and disgrace. Many people told me it was common for the older generation, especially fathers, not to tell their children about their lives.”

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The Osumi family in front of their barrack unit, Gila Relocation Camp (1945)

On December 7, 1941 Rev. Paul Osumi was arrested “on suspicion of being an alien enemy,” as were many influential and well-educated Japanese nationals. He was jailed and subsequently sent to detention camps, first on Oahu, then in New Mexico. He petitionedand was finally approved in 1943for relocation to Gila Relocation Camp in Arizona where his family (pictured, right), including a three-year-old Norman, joined him in 1944 to live for the remainder of the war.

Norman’s biography of his father provides details of the internment experience and the correspondence between Rev. Osumi and numerous officials as he attempted to clear his name and obtain his release. It was not until 1988 that the United States government issued an official apology to internees, along with monetary redress. Among the documents Norman found in his father’s files was a letter from The White House, signed by George Bush, which must have accompanied the restitution received by Rev. Osumi.

TT_RevOsumiChurchBell_web

Rev. Paul Osumi and Mrs. Janet Osumi in front of Nu‘uanu Congregational Church.

After the war, the Osumi family returned to Hawaii where Rev. Osumi ministered at churches in Waialua, ‘Ewa and Nu‘uanu. His “Today’s Thought” column began appearing in The Honolulu Advertiser six mornings a week in 1957. They also ran in the Hawaii Hochi starting in 1960, and the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner in Nome, Alaska from 1980 to 1984. In 1965, Rev. Osumi started the now-common practice of offering Hawai‘i weddings for couples from Japan.

Couples married by Rev. Osumi often cite his Ten Commandments for a Happy Marriage:

1. Remember marriage is a 100-100 proposition. It is not a 50-50.
2. Neglect the whole world rather than each other.
3. Never meet or part without an affectionate hug or kiss.
4. Each day say at least one nice thing to each other.
5. Never go to bed angry. Settle all differences before the sun goes down.
6. Do not argue. Always talk things over.
7. Do not nag or indulge in fault-finding.
8. Never bring up mistakes of the past.
9. When you have made a mistake, say, “I am sorry,” and ask for forgiveness.
10. Never raise your voice or shout at each other unless the house is on fire.

It is advice like this that stuck with readers of Rev. Osumi’s column for decades. “My father’s words had a great impact on my life,” Norman says, “and on so many others’ too. People needed guidance in their lives and he tried to provide that. Father’s daily sayings gave people in Hawai‘i a set of values for living happy and meaningful lives. If by reading this book, they can gain some insight to live a better life, I will be happy.”

Today’s Thought—Rev. Paul Osumi: The Man & His Message is available for pre-order now on our website and will be available in local bookstores after September 15. For more information about the Legacy Isle Publishing imprint, please visit the website.

Feng Shui for Interiors Classes with Clear Englebert

Author and feng shui expert Clear Englebert

Author and feng shui expert Clear Englebert

Best-selling author Clear Englebert (Feng Shui for Hawai‘i Gardens, Bedroom Feng Shui) will offer Feng Shui for Interiors classes in Honolulu on June 7 and June 8. In addition, Englebert’s special guest during the June 7 class will be Angi Ma Wong, best-selling author (Feng Shui Dos and Taboos series) and the only feng shui consultant featured on the Oprah Winfrey Show. She has also made appearances on Live With Regis and Kelly, CNN Headline News, the Discovery Channel and the Learning Channel.

Friday, June 7, 6:30-8:30pm — Interior Chi Flow Class (Class Fee $25)

This class introduces Chi energy, which is the most basic feng shui concept. The class also covers how to maximize Chi’s beneficial flow and retain it within a home; the importance of doors and windows; how to use feng shui cures; how to locate the powerful spots within a room; how to counter harsh energy within the home, such as open beams and ceiling fans; furniture selection and placement.

Feng shui consultant Angi Ma Wong. (Photo courtesy Angi Ma Wong)

Meet & Greet Autograph Session with Angi Ma Wong – 6:00pm

This session is for attendees of the Interior Chi Flow class only. Please bring your copies of Wong’s books with you for autographs. (Books will not be available for sale.) Wong will provide a free update for page 22 for those who have the original edition of Feng Shui Dos and Taboos (white cover; bring your book with you).

Saturday, June 8, 6:30-8:30pm — The Feng Shui Bagua (Class Fee $25)

This class explains the Bagua map, a nine-area grid (based on the entrance) that lies over the floor plan. Yin and Yang are discussed, as well as the Five Elements and their application to furnishings. The power of color is covered and the two power corners, Wealth and Relationship, are discussed in depth.

All classes will be held in the Private Function Room in the Executive Center, Lobby Level, next to Hukilau Restaurant. Class fee is $25 per class. Validated parking is available and no pre-registration is required; walk-ins are welcome and audio recording for personal use is permitted.

Hawaii Book & Music Festival 2013

Come see us at the annual
Hawaii Book & Music Festival!

Saturday, May 18 (10AM – 5PM)
Sunday, May 19 (10AM – 6PM)
Honolulu Hale Grounds

This year, our booth has moved and we’ll be right next to the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities Pavilion, where all weekend long, authors and experts will talk about “Telling Lives” in a series of discussion panels centered on the theme of memoir and biography. Several of our own Watermark Publishing authors will be taking part on the panels, and if you’re interested in publishing your own memoir, come talk to us about our new imprint, Legacy Isle Publishing!

Our booth is located in the new “Hawaii Publishers Village” so you can shop not just our books, but the rest of the local publishers’ as well.  This is a wonderful opportunity to score great deals, support the Island publishing industry and discover new books from local authors! We already said “great deals” but we just can’t emphasize enough the fantastic bargains you’ll find on books! (Scroll down to the end of this post for a special coupon offer from us.)

Here’s a look at which of our authors will be taking part in the Festival and where you can find them:

2013SpeakersGov. Ben Cayetano
BEN: A Memoir from Street Kid to Governor
Sat., May 18 | 10AM
“Kiss & Tell — The Naked Truth”
Telling Lives Discussion Panel
Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities Pavilion

Makia Malo with Pamela Young & Jeff Gere
My Name is Makia: A Memoir of Kalaupapa
Sat., May 18 | 10AM
Talk-Story and Reading
ALANA Hawaiian Culture Pavilion

Andrew Catanzariti, illustrator
Wordsworth! Stop the Bulldozer!
Sat., May 18 | Noon
Children’s Book Read-Aloud
Illustrating Children’s Books Discussion
Keiki Read-Aloud Pavilion

Gail Miyasaki & Ted Tsukiyama (Hawaii Nikkei History Editorial Board)
Japanese Eyes, American Heart — Vol. 2
Voices from the Home Front in World War II Hawaii
Sat., May 18 | 3PM
“Living Memory — Honoring the Past”
Telling Lives Discussion Panel
Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities Pavilion

Tom Moffatt
Showman of the Pacific: 50 Years of Radio & Rock Stars
Sun., May 19 | 3PM
“Perfect Pitch — Telling Musical Lives”
Telling Lives Discussion Panel
Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities Pavilion

And, as promised, here’s a special savings coupon for you! Bring it to our booth on Saturday, May 18, or Sunday, May 19, and we’ll give you $10 off your $25 purchase. (Sorry, but the discount does not apply to purchases of our super bargain priced used books, and cannot be combined with other offers.)

HBMF2013CouponCan’t make it to the Festival? We’re sad to hear we won’t see you. But you can still get a 25% discount on our books by shopping online during the HBMF week (May 13 through 19). Free shipping on all orders over $25. Use coupon code HBMF13 at http://www.bookshawaii.net. (Excludes our used book selections.)

Wordsworth’s Poe-TREE Contest Winners

Happy Earth Day, everyone! We are celebrating by announcing the winners of the Wordsworth the Poet “Poe-TREE Contest!”

In the Wordsworth Poe-TREE Contest, students were asked to write a poem celebrating their favorite tree, following the model of Wordsworth the Mouse and his friends in the book Wordsworth! Stop the Bulldozer! The young mice in the story campaign to save the trees in their community by writing poems reminding all the neighbors about the special qualities of the trees around them.

Poems were judged based on creativity, poetic merit and how well they conveyed what makes the trees special to the students. The six contest winners will receive a copies of each of the three books in the Wordsworth series, a gardening tool kit and a Koa Legacy Tree from the Hawaiian Legacy Reforestation Initiative, donated by Hawaiian Legacy Hardwoods.

MakaylaRoseMolden (current)

Makayla Rose Molden

K-5 Division Winners:

Makayla Rose Molden (age 6, Kapolei, Mauka Lani Elementary), untitled

The Mountain Apple tree is yummy to me.
The fruit is up so high to knock it down is a game I try.
I collect the fruit and make apple pie.

 

 

Eli Wolfe

Eli Wolfe

Eli Wolfe (age 5, Honolulu, University Laboratory School), “Banyan Tree”

I like to climb the
Banyan tree
at Barwick.
I can climb to
the sky.
You should try it too
someday.
It is so fun.

 

Grade 6-8 Division:

Cindy Tsou

Cindy Tsou

Min-Hua (Cindy) Tsou (age 11, Kapolei, Kapolei Middle School), “Red Maple Tree (Acer rubrum)”

A bright, scarlet leaf blew by.
A red lobed leaf fall and fly.
It can be red, yellow and even green.
Red maple trees makes a beautiful scene.
It grows in the north, with it’s flower blooming back and forth.
A red maple tree brings red, bright shines.
A red maple is of course, very fine.

 

Emerson Goo

Emerson Goo

Emerson Goo (age 12, Honolulu, Niu Valley Middle School), “Forest Guardians”

Sentinels at watch
Forest guardians holding
Treasured memories

 

 

 

Grade 9-12 Division:

Sophie Corless

Sophie Corless

Sophie Corless (age 15, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, Northern Highlands Regional High School), “The Lemon Tree”

The cool sticky air clings to me;
my bare feet squelch in the grass
just after the rain shower.
The lemon tree stands in the back corner
towering over the garden, and has a prevailing presence.
Under the tree lies my step ladder,
with my initials carved in the leg.
The wicker basket dangles
on a tiny branch at my height.
I have my technique down,
twist and snap over and over again.
Even the bees and ants are fixated on my movements,
their fragile wings and tiny legs
seem to stop to observe.
Little droplets collect in the pores of the rind,
making my hand cool,
droplets of lemon juice ooze through the pores
and run down my hand to my wrist and to my elbow,
stopping and then dripping off.
By the end I am covered in a mixture of rain and lemon,
dried and sticky.
With every lemon I snap off,
the branch snaps back and sprinkles me with rain.
I swear I hear my sweltering forehead
sizzle against the cool droplets.
In the kitchen I squeeze every last lemon,
popping the juice into the pitcher with the yellow flowers,
along with a fistful of sugar and a splash of water.
I crack the ice tray in half, scooping out the cubes.
The first sip makes my face contort
into an uncomfortable position,
one you can’t avoid,
but the last is always the sweetest.

ZoeEdelmanBrier

Zoe Edelman Brier

Zoe Edelman Brier (age 18, Allendale, New Jersey, Northern Highlands Regional High School), “Veins of Color”

I remember maple Leaf picking
with my father before the bus
came to ship me off
to a grey school building
with a grey blacktop
and grey windows.
The colors of the Leaves
were brighter than anything
I’d ever seen, standing out
against the blah of morning.
even through fog,
the Leaves shown like bright beacons
of change and hope for the future.
the Leaves would vein and crinkle
in red and orange and yellow,
mixing in a thin canvas.
My father would sit me on his shoulders
and have me reach the highest branch
possible to get the best Leaf
to press in a book that I still have
12 years later, the colors frozen in time,
unbrowned and delicate, red stains
clashing with the dark green of Leaf.

Congratulations to all our winners! Go give your favorite tree a hug!

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